BLM Black Lives Matter Hat by Donna Druchunas
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BLM Black Lives Matter Hat

Knitting
April 2017
Aran (8 wpi) ?
20 stitches and 28 rows = 4 inches
in stockinette stitch
US 7 - 4.5 mm
200 yards (183 m)
20 in (51cm) circumference, will stretch to fit head several inches larger
This pattern is available as a free Ravelry download

This is a revised version of my Resist hat. The chart is also included in the Knitting as a Political Act ebook.

I, perhaps, have a weird life and a weird family. But I prefer to think of myself as quintessentially American. I have cousins who are Black, Asian, Hispanic, and White. When I was a teenager, our household included two mothers (one black and one white) and four daughters (two black and two white). We called ourselves Sisters A, B, C, and D based on our birth order.

I still struggle with having white privilege and not doing all I can to oppose the systemic racism in our society. Many people confuse racism with prejudice. Prejudice is a personal attitude toward a person of a different ethnic background.

Systemic racism is “about the way racism is built into every level of our society. While few people today consider themselves racist, racism itself persists in our schools, offices, court system, police departments, and elsewhere.”

I made and wear this hat to support my sisters and cousins. Let’s all work together to make a better world.


I’ve received a couple of comments on this hat that say “All Lives Matter.” Here is my response:

All lives do matter, but many people either do not believe that Black lives matter as much as White lives do, or do not understand that racism is rampant in America and part of our social system. When you refute “Black Lives Matter” with the statement “All Lives Matter” you are revealing your own internal -- even if unintentional -- racism. Another way to say it, is that you are exhibiting “the racism of good intentions.”

If you want to learn more about this, you should read the book Stamped from the Beginning: The Definitive History of Racist Ideas in America by Ibram X. Kendi.