Chelsea Sweater by Whistle and Wool

Chelsea Sweater

Knitting
February 2019
Super Bulky (5-6 wpi) ?
9 stitches and 13 rows = 4 inches
in Stockinette
US 15 - 10.0 mm
500 - 600 yards (457 - 549 m)
S, (M), L, (XL), 2X, (4X)
Flag of English English
This pattern is available for $5.50 USD buy it now

Skill Level- Beginner +, if you can knit in the round, I created this to be an easy transition for you.
Stitches to know: Must know K & P stitch and a Make one stitch. However I included a picture tutorial to teach you how to do a M1. So really, just K & P titch must be known.

The Chelsea Knit Sweater uses a very classic, comfortable and flattering silhouette at the same time as it being an easy, and quick project! #6 Weight Yarn needed. I used Wool Ease Thick and Quick

This Garment is constructed in one large piece, Neck down, Raglan Style, in the round. This garment does not require any stitching of sections together. Arms are knitted (added) onto the live stitches when you’re done with the body. Instructions for blocking are at the end.

Tall (Petite) customization included: For an overall added (shortened) length you could add (remove) Rounds right before your Ribbing sections.

Sizes: S, (M), L, (XL), 2X, (4X)

MEASUREMENTS: 3-inch positive ease
Chest: 37, (39), 43, (48), 52, (54) Inches

PHOTO TUTORIAL: Included

YARN: Made in collaboration with Lion Brand Yarn, also available as a Kit under my section on their website Follow the link
http://www.lionbrand.com/designers/whistle-and-wool

More Cozy Designs:
https://www.etsy.com/your/shops/WhistleAndWool/tools/list...

A bit of History behind the name:
The word Chelsea (also formerly Chelceth, Chelchith, or Chelsey) originates from the Old English term for “landing place on the river for chalk or limestone” (Cealc-hyð: chalk-wharf, in Anglo-Saxon). Chelsea hosted the Synod of Chelsea in 787 AD. By 1694, Chelsea – always a popular location for the wealthy, and once described as “a village of palaces” – had a population of 3,000. Even so, Chelsea remained rural and served London to the east as a market garden, a trade that continued until the 19th-century development boom which caused the final absorption of the district into the metropolis. The street crossing that was known as Little Chelsea, Park Walk, linked Fulham Road to King’s Road and continued to the Thames and local ferry down Lover’s Lane, renamed “Milmans Street” in the 18th century.

Be Cozy, Be Kind!
I N S T A G R A M: @whistleandwool, #chelseasweater

COPYRIGHT RESTRICTIONS:These patterns are copyright of Whistle and Wool© so YOU MAY NOT COPY, ALTER, ADJUST, SHARE, RECORD, REDISTRIBUTE OR RESELL MY PATTERN. No tutorials or any kind of demonstrations may be made using any information contained in my Pattern. You also DO NOT have permission to use any of my Photos.