Jersey Peach by Vanessa Ewing

Jersey Peach

Knitting
April 2020
Light Fingering ?
26 stitches and 34 rows = 4 inches
in stockinette stitch after blocking on larger needle
US 3 - 3.25 mm
US 4 - 3.5 mm
1080 - 3150 yards (988 - 2880 m)
Sizes 1 (2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9)
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Top down, seamless, lace back pullover with twisted rib detailing down the sides of the pullover and along the length of the sleeve, forming a V shape pattern for the cuff. Twisted Rib along the sides of the body eliminate the need for shaping. The lace patterning looks like tiny little peach pits!

#sizeinclusive

Measurements
Sizes 1 (2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9)
Approximate Chest Measurement 30 (34 37 ½, 42, 45 ½, 50, 54, 58, 62)”
Designed to be worn with 0-2” of positive ease at chest
Center Back Neck to Back Hem 22 (23, 24, 25 ½, 26 ½, 28, 29, 31, 32)”
The front hem is 2” shorter than the back. Shown in size 2.

Materials
1080 (1240, 1430, 1700, 1920, 2230, 2490, 2860, 3150) yards of Fingering Weight Yarn.
(all yardages have a 10% buffer added on)
We used Cape May Fiber Sock (75% Superwash Merino, 25% Nylon, 463 yards / 100 Gram):
3 (3, 4, 4, 5, 5, 6, 7, 7)—Skeins
Color: Jersey Peach (Sherbert Orangey Pink)

  • US Size 3 (3.25mm) and 4 (3.5mm) 16” circular needle
  • US Size 3 (3.25mm) and 4 (3.5mm) 32 (32, 32, 40, 40, 40, 47, 47, 47)” circular needle
  • US Size 3 (3.25mm) and 4 (3.5mm) DPNs
  • 8 stitch markers
  • 2 st holders

Gauge
26 sts, 34 rows= 4” in st st worked in the round and worked flat on US Size 4 (3.5mm) knitting needle after blocking.
26 sts, 34 rows = 4” in Lace Stitch on US Size 4 (3.5mm) knitting needle after blocking.

If you are making sizes 6, 7, 8 or 9, consider using a yarn that has a synthetic blend (for example: nylon, acrylic, microfiber, elastin). The synthetic will help hold the shape of the pullover and prevent it from growing too much lengthwise. As an alternative, you could stress-test your swatch by pulling it lengthwise and seeing how much change in size occurs from the bounce-back.