Lots of Combs by Claudia Eisenkolb

Lots of Combs

Knitting
May 2020
Sport (12 wpi) ?
24 stitches and 32 rows = 4 inches
in stockinette stitch
US 4 - 3.5 mm
984 yards (900 m)
73" / 183 cm length, 15½" / 39 cm width
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Lots of Combs is a rectangular stole that is worked lengthwise using 2 colors of the same yarn.

The stitch patterns use slip stitches and cables to create a textured surface. The 1-color pattern features stripes in stockinette and reverse stockinette while the 2-color pattern features stockinette stripes in two colors, hence the name. Because of the slip stitches you only work with one color at a time.

As the 1-color pattern is a variation of the 2-color pattern both patterns flow beautifully into each other.
For the long edges you are working a small piping after CO and before BO. This gives you neat edges after blocking.

SIZE
73” / 183 cm length, 15½“ / 39 cm width; tassels are optional

YARDAGE
mYak Tibetan Cloud in colors Ginepro (MC) 2 skeins and Wild Daisy (CC)1 skein or 656 + 328 yd / 600 + 300 m sport weight yarn; I used up the entire skeins

Everybody knits differently, so given yardage is an estimate.

GAUGES
24 sts x 48 rows per 4” / 10 cm in 1-color pattern with US 4 / 3.50 mm needle before washing and blocking.
24 sts x 34 rows per 4” / 10 cm in 1-color pattern with US 4 / 3.50 mm needle after washing and blocking.
24 sts x 36 rows per 4“ / 10 cm in 2-color pattern with US 4 / 3.50 mm needle before and after washing and blocking.

A different gauge will affect size and yardage needed.

NEEDLE
US 4 / 3.50 mm circular needle, 59” / 150 cm long

NOTIONS
Cable needle (if you prefer to cable with needle), tapestry needle for weaving in ends; I recommend using blocking wires and T-pins for blocking.

REQUIRED TECHNIQUES
Cable CO; knit and purl stitches; k2tog; slwyif, slwyib; 2/2 RC, 2/2 LC.

SKILL LEVEL
Intermediate

Thanks to my lovely test knitters and my tech editor James Bartley.