Ocean by Christina Danaee

Ocean

Knitting
January 2019
DK (11 wpi) ?
20 stitches and 30 rows = 4 inches
in Rev St St, using larger needle, working in the round, blocked.
US 4 - 3.5 mm
US 6 - 4.0 mm
750 - 1250 yards (686 - 1143 m)
1 (2, 3, 4, 5, 6)
Flag of English English
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Ocean is a cropped, relaxed fit pullover with a graduating twisted rib yoke. The body and sleeves are worked in reverse stockinette stitch. The pattern was inspired by texture of ribbed shells found on the beach and the pairing of this pattern with Magpie Fiber’s Swanky DK in their color “Siren Song” immediately made me think of a mermaid’s shell top.

Sizes:
1 (2, 3, 4, 5, 6)
Finished Bust: 36 (39, 46.5, 50, 53, 59)”- 91.5 (99, 118, 127, 134.5, 150)cm
Intended to be worn with 4-6”-10-15.25cm of positive ease.

Yarn:
Magpie Fibers – Swanky DK
80% Merino, 10% Nylon, 10% Cashmere goat
250 yards / 100 grams
3 (4, 4, 5, 5, 6) skeins Siren’s Song
-or-
750 (850, 950, 1050, 1150, 1250)yds of an equivalent DK weight yarn.

Materials:
US 4-3.5mm circular needle 32” or longer
US 6-4.0mm circular needle 32” or longer
Optional: US 4-3.5mm circular needle 16” for neck and sleeves
Optional: US 6-4.0mm circular needle 16” for neck and sleeves
Stitch holder or scrap yarn (for sleeves)
Tapestry needle

Gauge:
20sts x 30 rows = 4”-10cm in Rev St st using larger needle, working in the round and blocked.
21sts x 30 rows = 4”-10cm in twisted rib chart pattern using larger needle, working in the round, blocked.

Techniques Used:
Knitting in the round
Knitting from a chart
Tubular Cast on
Tubular Bind Off

Teal Version : Magpie Fibers - Swanky DK in Siren Song
Lt Grey Version: Echoview Fiber Mill - Ranger DK in Chickadee

Edit: Ocean was originally named “Oshun” but has been changed as of May 27th 2019. The original name was a westernized way of spelling the name of Ọṣun, (sometimes also known as Ochún or Oxúm), an orisha, a spirit, a deity, or a goddess that reflects one of the manifestations of God in the Ifá and Yoruba religions. In addition to the misrepresentation of her name I also included details about her which were not accurate. For these misrepresentations I am very sorry. I generally draw inspiration in form and story from various sources and have always been interested in cultural mythologies but it’s very tricky when relying on sources of information for cultures with which you are not intimately familiar. I did not do enough research into Ọṣun before naming my pattern after her, nor could I ever know how problematic my original description of her was without having personal knowledge of the religions and culture in which she is present. I in no way intended to claim ownership over her name and her importance to those who honor her and I am deeply sorry for those who were hurt by my choice to use her name here.