Pavuk vest by Teti Lutsak

Pavuk vest

Knitting
March 2024
Fingering (14 wpi) ?
26 stitches and 32 rows = 4 inches
in stockinette in the round
US 1½ - 2.5 mm
US 3 - 3.25 mm
650 - 1450 yards (594 - 1326 m)
1 (2, 3, 4, 5) (6, 7, 8, 9) see more details below
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This pattern is available for €8.00 EUR
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Pavuk vest is a sister design to my Pavuk pullover.

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Pavuk means “spider” in Ukrainian, but we are not talking arachnids here. That same name we use for a traditional Christmas decoration — web-like mobiles made of straw. “Spiders” were meant to hang from the top of the ceiling in a corner called “pokut” (the corner decorated with icons, embroidered cloth etc). Just where the real spiders prefer to live. The “spider’s” mission was to absorb all the negative energy, purify the ambiance and bring happiness to the house. Every year during Christmas celebration the old spider was burned and a new one created. This craft has originated in Northern and Eastern Europe and can be found in most places, where grain growing (and straw) is a key component of people’s lives. In Poland they are known as pajaki, and himmeli in Finland.

This cropped V-neck vest is knit bottom-up in the round until the underarms and features stranded colourwork and a small intarsia section worked in the round. It also comes with an extended colourwork chart for a longer version, an optional slopped shoulder shaping and plenty of customisation options.

You can take a closer look at my sample and discover the design process in this episode of my podcast.

Sizes

The pattern is written for nine sizes 
1 (2, 3, 4, 5) (6, 7, 8, 9)
with a finished bust circumference of ca. 90 (100, 110, 120, 130) (140, 150, 160, 170) cm // 36 (40, 44, 48, 52) (56, 60, 64, 68) in incl. at least 15-20 cm (6-8 in) of the recommended positive ease.

The sample is shown oversized in size 3 on a 160 cm (5.3 ft) tall model with 84 cm (33 in) bust circumference. For more of the finished garment measurements, please refer to the schematic.

Yarn

  • MC: ca. 120 (135, 155, 175, 190) (215, 230, 260, 285) g or 2 (2, 2, 2, 2) (3, 3, 3, 3) skeins of No.3 from G-Uld, 100% New Zealand lambswool, with 450 m (492 yds) in 100 g, 
shown in colourway Madder (Krb223093n);

or ca. 540 (608, 698, 788, 855) (968, 1035, 1170, 1283) m // 591 (665, 763, 862, 935)(1058, 1132, 1280, 1403) yds of any other fingering weight yarn with a matching gauge.
The estimated MC yardage includes 10% extra.

  • CC: ca. 21 (24, 26, 29, 31) (33, 35, 37, 41) g 
of the same yarn, shown in colourway Cochenille (CoB122121n);

or ca. 95 (108, 117, 131, 140) (149, 158, 167, 185) m // 103 (118, 128, 143, 153) (162, 172, 182, 202) yds of any other fingering weight yarn.
The estimated CC yardage includes 5% extra.

Needles and notions

  • 2.5 mm (US 1.5) and
3.25 mm (US 3) circular needles;
  • stitch holders, spare cables, spare circular needles or scrap yarn to keep sts on hold;
  • a few stitch markers, one of which is removable;
  • a tapestry needle or a crochet hook to weave in the ends.

Gauge

  • 26 sts & 32 rnds in 10 cm (4 in) on 3.25 mm (US 3) needles measured over 
st st worked in the round after blocking;
  • 26 sts & 28 rnds in 10 cm (4 in) on 3.25 mm (US 3) needles measured over stranded colourwork worked in the round after blocking;
  • 32 sts & 40 rnds in 10 cm (4 in) on 2.5 mm (US 1.5) needles measured over 
1x1 ribbing worked in the round after blocking.

Adjust the needle sizes if necessary to obtain the correct gauge.