Propitiate by Hunter Hammersen
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Propitiate

Knitting
July 2009
Fingering (14 wpi) ?
32 stitches = 4 inches
in blocked stockinette
300 - 400 yards (274 - 366 m)
written in five sizes and three gauges to fit most anyone, at 8spi, fits a foot or leg of 7.5 [8.5, 9.75, 10.75, 11.75] inches
This pattern is available for $6.95 USD buy it now

Propitiate verb
- to gain or regain the favor or goodwill of, to appease

So I’ve knit a lot of socks. And I’ve talked to a lot of sock knitters. And from what I can tell, what an awful lot of us are looking for is a pattern that’s versatile, comfy, and easy to knit…but not boring. That’s a lot to ask from a sock, but I think this one nails it!

The pattern’s mellow enough to pass muster with the ‘I only like sedate socks’ crowd, but it perks right up if you want to play with a crazier yarn. The ribs mean it fits and feels great. They also mean it’s a breeze to knit. And that lovely round little cable is just enough to keep your attention (I kept wanting to just finish one more repeat so I could watch another circle form!). It’s a perfect balance of everything you need from a sock, and I suspect you’ll find yourself knitting this one more than once.

The pattern comes in five sizes (54, 62, 70, 78, and 86 stitch cast on) to fit most anyone. And of course you should feel free to adjust your gauge a bit to fine tune the fit of the sock. Just be sure that you’re working at a gauge that gives you a sturdy sock fabric with your chosen yarn. I recommend working at something around 7, 8, or 9 stitches per inch, and I’ve included a table to help you figure out what gauge you’ll want to use for the size you need.

These are perfect for you if:

  • You know ribbed socks secretly are the best socks
  • You’re looking for a super versatile pattern that will fit most anyone

They’re not for you if:

  • You don’t like charts (the pattern uses charts)
  • You hate swatching (you need to swatch to check your needle size)