Solvik Shirt by Skeindeer Knits

Solvik Shirt

Knitting
July 2019
Worsted (9 wpi) ?
16 stitches and 26 rows = 4 inches
US 9 - 5.5 mm
483 - 868 yards (442 - 794 m)
15 sizes to fit busts 80-150 cm (31-59") plus 20 cm (8") positive ease
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This very simple and quick-to-make summer shirt consists of simple garter stitch and a Scandinavian lace pattern, more commonly found in shoulder draping lace shawls. Solvik means sun cove, and was once the name of a long gone smallholding by the lake of Losna in Gudbrandsdalen, Norway, where my Great Grandfather grew up.

I hope you will enjoy this pattern, and if you need any help or have any suggestions, please do not hesitate to contact me in my Ravelry group ‘Skeindeer Knits’. It’s the best place for swift support. Happy knitting!

Yarn
Rowan Creative Linen (50% Linen, 50% Cotton, 200 / 219 yds, 100g). Colourway 625 Teal.
Rowan classifies this as DK, but I would strongly argue that this is more of a worsted weight yarn

Yarn alternatives
Sandnes Line, Quince & Co Kestrel, or KnitPicks CotLin
Other worsted weight cotton linen blend yarns will also do.

Yarn amounts
(442, 464, 486, 509, 541) (563, 586, 608, 642, 665) (688, 711, 748, 771, 794) m / (484, 508, 532, 556, 591) (616, 641, 665, 703, 728) (753, 778, 818, 843, 869) yds.

Gauge
16 sts x 26 rnds = 10 cm / 4” in garter stitch.

Needle
Gauge-size needles.
The sample was made using 5.5 mm (US 9)

Garment bust
(100, 105, 110, 115, 120) (125, 130, 135, 140, 145) (150, 155, 160, 165, 170) cm / (39, 41, 43, 45, 47) (49, 51, 53, 55, 57) (59, 61, 63, 65, 67)” To be worn with 20 cm / 8” positive ease at the bust. The sample is size 6.

Body length
41-43 cm / 16-17”

Armhole depth
18 cm / 7”

Neck opening
48 cm / 18”

Construction
This shirt has a very simple construction. First you knit the front, from the shoulders down to the underarm. Then you pick up stitches for the shoulders and cast on for the neck opening, and work the back from the shoulders down to the underarm.

From the underarm the shirt is worked flat in a manner that will appear as though it was worked in the round. This is done by alternating the two yarns so that you work one on the wrong side and the other on the right side. When you do this, the yarns will cross over such that they are effectively “joining in the round”, and you do not have to purl.