Woolly Mammoth Tea Cosy by K.M. Bedigan

Woolly Mammoth Tea Cosy

Knitting
July 2020
yarn held together
Fingering
+ Fingering
= DK (11 wpi) ?
32 stitches and 44 rows = 4 inches
in Stocking Stitch on Smaller (Larger) needles
US 4 - 3.5 mm
US 0 - 2.0 mm
318 yards (291 m)
One Size as Written: To fit standard tea pots up to 18 " / 45.75 cm circumference.
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A very woolly tea cosy! Loop stitch adds all over textural interest - whilst adding extra insulation to keep your brew warm. Even your tea pot itself becomes part of the design; choose a co-ordinating colours for a subtle look, or go bold with a contrasting combination!

Sample uses: Jamieson & Smith 2 Ply Jumper Weight – in the following shades:
Colour 1: 132 (bright teal)
Colour 2: FC41 (dark teal)
Colour 3: 1 (white)

Sample shown on a 18 “ / 45.75 cm circumference tea pot

Materials
3.5 mm / US 4 circular needles
2 mm / US 0 circular needles or DPNS

318 yds / 291 m fingering weight yarn in three shades
Colour 1: 158.5 yds / 145 m
Colour 2: 147.5 yds / 135 m
Colour 2: 12 yds / 11 m

Stitch markers (2)
Stitch holder, spare needle or waste yarn for holding stitches
Tapestry needle
Buttons (3 in a dark colour, approx. 0.2 “ / 5 mm in size)
Embroidery needle
Embroidery thread
Pipe cleaners
Toy stuffing

Size
One size as written: to fit standard tea pots up to 18 “ / 45.75 cm circumference. Height from edge to top of crown: 6 “ / 15 cm.

Gauge
16 sts x 28 rows = 4 “ / 10 cm in stocking stitch on the larger needles, using two strands of yarn held together
32 sts x 44 rows = 4 “ / 10 cm in stocking stitch on the smaller needles, using a single strand of yarn