Bimberi by Sharon Boswell

Bimberi

Knitting
December 2014
Aran (8 wpi) ?
4 stitches and 8 rows = 1 inch
in K3,P3 rib
US 7 - 4.5 mm
160 - 170 yards (146 - 155 m)
One size
This pattern is available for $4.00 USD buy it now

NOTE: Version 2 of the pattern (V2) contained some extra K1s that should not have been there, please make sure you are working from Version 3 (V3), uploaded on 10 Jan 2015.

Purchase both Bimberi and its partner scarf Majura and receive a $2 discount, please use the add to cart option to put both in your cart together before checking out. If you purchased one or the other previously you will still receive the discount!

Bimberi is a warm textured cowl in a reversible rib pattern that likes to form concertina folds around your neck. It is designed to be worked at a firmer gauge than usually recommended for the yarn, to give the cowl body to keep its shape.

Three colours are used and three skeins is plenty to make two cowls or may be just enough to make three.

The design may easily be adapted to make a longer cowl, just double the number of cast on stitches (second sample will be added soon).

Techniques used

DCD: slip two stitches together as if to k2tog, knit the next stitch, pass both slipped stitched over together. The wonderful TechKnitter blog has great diagram for this, she calls it the 3-stitch decrease, its below the K2tog and SSK on this page.

Purlwise DCD: Slip two stitches together as if to P2tog through the back of loop, purl the next stitch, pass both slipped stitches over together.

(K1, P1, K1) into same stitch: work K1 as usual but do not let the stitch drop off the holding needle, bring yarn to front, P1 into the front of the stitch, bring yarn to back and K1 into the same stitch. Now drop the stitch from the holding needle. There is a great YouTube tutorial for this here.

(P1, K1, P1) into same stitch: work P1 as usual but do not let the stitch drop off the holding needle, bring yarn to front, K1 into the front of the stitch, bring yarn to back and P1 into the same stitch.

Why the name?
Bimberi is the name of the highest point in the Australian Capital Territory where I live.

Thanks once again to my wonderful tech editor Polly Hammond of Queue and Accumulate, aka thegoodwitch on ravelry, for ensuring that the instructions actually say what I mean them to :-)