Lierne Cowl aka Tierceron II by Lavish Craft

Lierne Cowl aka Tierceron II

Knitting
November 2013
Sport (12 wpi) ?
37 stitches and 39 rows = 4 inches
in Ktbl p2 ribbing
US 3 - 3.25 mm
US 4 - 3.5 mm
US 5 - 3.75 mm
160 - 190 yards (146 - 174 m)
one size (W adult)
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Lierne Cowl - aka Tierceron II

Charted pattern. Using American English knitting terms abbreviations and symbols - glossary provided.

Intermediate skill level. Recommend experience with uneven/moving repeat boundaries, but instructions and clear chart provided.

Overview

Worked in the round, mid line outward, from a provisional CO.

Uses needle size progressions for shaping.

Tightly worked at the top to allow for a standing ‘collar’, which grows into a wider softer flow for the lace bottom.

Requires swatching for gauge/tension and blocking of finished item.

Tutorial images for blocking included (as separate optional print out section).

Materials

3 sizes of 16” (40 cm) circular needles
US 3, 4 & 5 (3.25, 3.5 & 3.75 mm)
~ or needle sequence that gives gauge

190 yards (170 m) sport weight yarn (11-12 WPI) Sample used Malabrigo Arroyo in ‘Glitter’
~ I recommend a multiple ply yarn with a minimum 50% animal fiber content for memory/stretch.

Row counter
Stitch Marker
Blocking surface & T pins
Tapestry needle to sew in tails
Cable Needle (optional -for alt. wrapping method)

Measurements

Final Sample
16” (40.5 cm) circumference at top edge

13.25” (34 cm) measured across bottom point to point laid flat

8” (20.5 cm) measured top to tip of lace edge point

’Lierne’ and ‘Tierceron’ are architectural terms, referring to specific forms of the vaulted arched ceilings in Gothic Cathedrals.