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Lizkor Remembrance Socks

Knitting
April 2013
Light Fingering / 3 ply ?
36 stitches and 50 rows = 4 inches in stockinette
US 1 - 2.25 mm
380 - 400 yards (347 - 366 m)
S, M, L

When I was 14, I went to the Boston Museum of Art. There was a special Holocaust exhibit being held. There were many mediums: needlework, paintings, sculptures. They discovered those who carried the wounds and could not SPEAK about their experiences could express themselves in art.
The piece that most moved me was comprised of many small barbs snipped from barbed wire. Each painted individually to create a pointillist picture. The field, the darkness, the guard tower, and off to one side, a break in the barbs. A small white barb was positioned just above, representing a dove breaking free. When I read the story of Regina Zielinski, her statement while running from the Sobibor camp, “I am free”, called to memory this painting.

When I stood at Zeppelin Field in 2010, singing the kiddish (blessing) with Jews, Catholics and Protestants, together in the place hitler gave hate speeches, this same feeling rose within me. “We are still here.” These socks have a subtle statement ringing through them. The hidden stars proclaim “We are still here. We are free. “

In remembrance of those who died, who survived, and the rescuers and liberators who risked their lives.

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Note: The United Nations and most of Europe, observes the International Day of Commemoration in Memory of the Victims of the Holocaust on January 27, the anniversary of the liberation the Nazi concentration and death camp Auschwitz-Birkenau in Poland on January 27, 1945.
Yom HaZikaron laShoah ve-laG’vurah, “Holocaust and Heroism Remembrance Day” also known as Yom HaShoah, is observed in Israel on Nisan 27, which is April 8-9, 2013.
The US Holocaust Memorial Museum provides support materials, for observing ”Days of Remembrance of the Victims of the Holocaust” which coincides with Yom HaShoah. This 8-day period, designated by the United States Congress, marks the anniversary of significant American involvement in liberating the concentration camps.