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Mothed

Knitting
September 2010
Sport / 5 ply (12 wpi) ?
17 stitches and 24 rows = 4 inches in stockinette stitch
US 8 - 5.0 mm
742 - 1484 yards (678 - 1357 m)
32 (35.75, 39.5, 44.25, 48, 51.75, 56.5) inches
This pattern is available for free.

I guess the name really does say it all, but here’s the back story…
I have had more than my fair share of loss by moth over the years. Every time it happens my heart feels a little more heavy. How do those winged monsters know which knit in my closet is my latest favourite woolly to wear?!?!

What I want for this season is an easy as pie, super soft, wonderfully warm, top down raglan with the simplest of details that weighs about two feathers. The kicker? I’ll be adding some real/simulated moth activity as I knit! Hey, if you can’t beat ‘em … join ‘em!

I’ve kept the design very simple so that my increasing collection of scarves and wraps will not be fighting for attention when I layer them on. The nice, open neckline has a very simple thick ridge pattern achieved by alternating double rounds of knit and purl. Neither the body nor sleeves have any shaping. All hems end with a round of reverse stockinette stitch before loosely binding off. The moth “activity” (aka- simple yarn over eyelets) can be found only on the sleeves-- starting with small nibbles at the top and working with increased hunger down to the bracelet length wrist.

Americo’s yarns are one of the most thrilling. Their thick and thin spun Winter Flamme offers the perfect combination of lightness and coverage when working with larger than labelled needles. This yarn blocks like a dream but I chose to let the edges of my version lightly roll for a casual and relaxed look. I know I will be stuffing this into my bag on those occasions when I am uncertain as to how chilly I’ll be when out and about. It can be quickly pulled out, flicked open and tossed on.

Maybe next summer when those moths are up to their mischief they’ll see the “damage” on the sleeves… consider it leftovers… and move on. Fingers crossed…