Oregon Waves Scarf by Lynn Venghaus

Oregon Waves Scarf

Knitting
April 2014
yarn held together
Fingering
+ Lace
= Fingering (14 wpi) ?
26 stitches and 25 rows = 4 inches
in stockinette
US 6 - 4.0 mm
375 - 400 yards (343 - 366 m)
7 inches wide x 5.5 feet long
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This pattern is available for $6.00 USD buy it now

Greetings from Oregon!
I like scarves that are completely reversible and don’t have a wrong side when worn. With this zigzag design, we now have another! The finished scarf is approximately 5-1/2 feet long and 7 inches wide after blocking. There are many places in nature where zigzags appear and the zigs and zags left in the sand as the tide goes out is just one of them. They often appear in the formations of the geese and ducks as they migrate and in the drifted snow on Mount Hood. I especially enjoy knitting things that reflect a bit of nature. The yarn’s weight and fiber content and the color you choose will determine if this is to be a scarf for a masculine or feminine person.

Skills you need to knit this scarf include: Knit, Purl, Work as Presented, and Seed Stitch

Materials: 750 yards of lace weight yarn (I used ‘Anne’, an alpaca silk blend held double) or you can use 375-400 yards of sock weight yarn. Needles straight or circular in size 6 US, 4mm. Two rings markers and a bit of colored yarn or a safety pin for marking the beginning of right side rows. Gauge isn’t critical as this is a scarf.

Instructions are written out but there’s also a detailed chart provided. For best results, the scarf should be blocked when completed. There are 28 rows to the zigzag design. Add about 90 yards of sock weight yarn (180 for lace weight to be held double) for each additional 6” of length if you wish to knit a longer scarf.

I’ve also included a suggestion for making the knitting easier if you prefer to work from the written instructions rather than from the chart.

You can easily convert this to a mobius by using DK or worsted weight yarn. Just skip the first and last six rows and sew the ends together after giving it a single twist.