Shirt Tail Fair Isle Pullover by Ann Feitelson

Shirt Tail Fair Isle Pullover

Knitting
August 2002
Fingering (14 wpi) ?
32 stitches and 32 rows = 4 inches
in stranded stockinette stitch
US 1 - 2.25 mm
US 3 - 3.25 mm
2860 yards (2615 m)
Body Circumference: 48"
Flag of English English
This pattern is available from schoolhousepress.com for $7.99.
Errata available: schoolhousepress.com

From Schoolhouse Press:

This gorgeous design by Ann Feitelson, author of The Art of Fair Isle Knitting, is a true work of art. Ann says, “It took me about four months to design and knit this sweater, which was really about three months of swatching and one month of real knitting.” The attention to detail shows, with the ingenious combination of 12 Shetland Spindrift colors and unique Shirt-Tail shaping. Large, easy to read charts, with full color assignment. Originally featured in the book Sweaters From Camp.

Print version comes in a 3-hole, archival quality sheet protector.

Sweater begins with a provisional cast-on and steeks to shape the curve of the shirt tail hem; after the shaping is completed, steeks are bound off and stitches cast on to unite front and back. Shoulders are shaped with short rows which are hidden when the shoulder is bound off by 3-Needle Bind-Off. Sleeve cap is also shaped with short rows, which involves some purling in pattern.

Only one size is given, but hints are given on modifying pattern for other sizes, either by adding another pattern column, or using smaller or larger needles to alter gauge.

Jamieson & Smith 2-ply Jumper Weight

3 - 202 Beige

3 - 1403 Barn Red

3 - 131 Violet

2 - 1283 Pink Mist

2 - 9144 Salmon

2 - 43 Crimson

1 - 20 Deep Purple

1 - FC34 Aqua Heather

1 - FC47 Bressay Blue

1 - FC49 Cornflower

3 - S135 Surf

1 - S684 Deep Cobalt

This pattern was recently reissued as a leaflet, available from Schoolhouse Press (new version corrects all errata). Since I knitted/designed it in 1995, the color palettes of Jamiesons and J&S have changed. I assessed the currently available colors and chose the best. (Ann Feitelson)