Smokin' by Jared Flood
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Smokin'

Knitting
October 2007
Bulky / 12 ply (7 wpi) ?
13 stitches and 23 rows = 4 inches
in Stockinette Stitch
US 10 - 6.0 mm
1090 - 1417 yards (997 - 1296 m)
Medium

ERRATA

The following is a correction to the paragraph directly following Row 16, found in the Left Column of Page 109: (errata indicated in bold)

Rep rows 9–16 three (three, four, four, five) times more, then rows 9-13 once (once, 0, 0, once) more. L & XL only: Purl back one row (WS).

The following are corrections to the Right and Left Saddle portion of the design, found in the Left Column of Page 110: (errata are indicated in bold)

Back Right Shoulder
Set-Up Row (partial): BO 8 (9, 8, 9 9)
Row 1 (RS) K to last sleeve st, ssk (working last sleeve st tog with first back st). Turn
Row 2 (WS) Sl1, p7 (8, 7, 8, 8). Turn.

further down page

Back left shoulder
Set-up row (partial) BO 8 (9, 8, 9 9)
Row 1 (WS) P to last sleeve st, p2tog (working last sleeve st tog with first back st). Turn.
Row 2 (RS) Slip 1, k7 (8, 7, 8, 8). Turn

From Book:

I’ve always been drawn to the classics - smoking jackets, cozy wool cartigans, and tweed in all forms. This pattern is a contemporary spin on an old standby, done up in a deep burgundy tweed, with large patch pockets to carry a pipe and glasses (or more fittingly, MP3 player, subway map, or cell phone), sophisticated leather buttons, and a classically indulgent shawl collar. It’s just the type of thing he’ll throw on while relaxing at the fireside with fresh coffee and a good book. Worked with chunky weight wool in a slightly tighter gauge than usual, this jacket like sweater knits up quickly and is sure to turn heads while keeping him warm and fashionable all winter.

Note: Sleeves and body are worked from the bottom up separately to the armholes. At this point, the three pieces are joined together on one circular needle and the yoke is shaped as one piece toward the collar, using raglan shaping and finishing with a saddle-yoke shoulder treatment. The button band and shawl collar are worked last and seamed to the body in order to most accurately place buttonholes and ease in bands.