Spring Bloom Mitts by Rachel Atkinson
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Spring Bloom Mitts

Knitting
March 2015
Worsted (9 wpi) ?
20 stitches and 32 rows = 4 inches
in stocking stitch
US 6 - 4.0 mm
0 - 230 yards (0 - 210 m)
One size – to fit hand circumference: 18-20cm / (7-7¾in)
This pattern is available for free.

Spring has finally sprung!
Inspired by blossoms these pretty handwarmers are great for any time of the year and a lovely way to practise cabling.
Use The Uncommon Thread Lush Worsted for a little bit of luxurious knitting!
The instructions for the ‘Spring Bloom’ panel are given as both charted and written instructions.

SIZE
One size – to fit hand circumference: 18-20cm / (7-7¾in)
at widest part of the hand
Length: 20.5cm (8in)

MATERIALS
Yarn: The Uncommon Thread Lush Worsted (Worsted
weight; 80% Superwash Merino, 10% Cashmere, 10%
Nylon; 212m / 231yds per 100g skein)
1 skein in Baby Elephant Walk

NEEDLES & NOTIONS
4mm (UK 8/US 6) knitting needles suitable for working in
the round – Use either a set double-pointed needles
(DPNs) or a circular needle with a minimum cable length
of 80cm (32in) for magic loop
Cable needle
Stitch markers
Waste yarn
Tapestry needle

TENSION
20 sts and 32 rows to 10cm (4in) over stocking stitch
(stockinette) on 4mm needles after blocking.
Take time to check your tension and adjust the needle
size accordingly to ensure an accurate finish.

PATTERN NOTES
It’s helpful to place a stitch marker either side of the 11- stitch Spring Bloom panel to keep track of where it is.
Take care not to cast off too tightly – use a larger needle
to cast off with if you’re worried about this.
I managed to squeeze two pairs of mitts from one skein
of yarn, but it was a close call! If you are planning to do
the same, then weigh the remaining yarn after
completing the first pair of mitts – if you have less than
50g of yarn remaining then reduce the cuff length by a
few centimetres to ensure you have enough to finish. It’s
also important to check your tension as this will affect the
amount of yarn required.