Spring Feverish 2 by Nick Davis
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Spring Feverish 2

Knitting
March 2017
DK (11 wpi) ?
13 stitches and 29 rows = 4 inches
in garter stitch, blocked
US 8 - 5.0 mm
US 9 - 5.5 mm
80 - 90 yards (73 - 82 m)
one size fits most adults as a headscarf or neckerchief
This pattern is available for $4.00 USD buy it now

Spring Feverish 2 is a mini-wave project, and part of the Spring Feverish series! Buy it alone, or in combination with the other Spring Feverish mini-projects; when purchased as a set, they are only $12, which breaks down to $3 per pattern.

This little kerchief fastens with a button, like Spring Feverish 1 and Spring Feverish 3 (aka Miniature Moon), and is knit from a modest amount of yarn (about 85 yards). It’s worked at a loose, airy gauge of 13 sts and 27 rows in 4” of blocked garter stitch, and features a traditional wave lace motif. The main size--with the nicest drape--is about 23” across the longest side; the smaller-gauge sample is about 21” across, and fits best as a headscarf, but doesn’t have the same flowing drape.

Though this pattern provides both official and lower-limit gauge options, gauge is important for this project. Needle sizes will vary with each knitter. Please be sure to check you gauge!

These tiny scarves are quick and intuitive, and only take a few hours to complete.

You’ll need:
-about 80-90 yards of Malabrigo Yarn Rastita or similar sport- to dk-weight yarn (samples are shown in Archangel, 850 colorway)
-one pair of straight needles in US8-9/5mm-5.5mm, or the size you need for gauge (the suggested needles are just a jumping-off point; it’s worth swatching to make sure you don’t end up with a tiny kerchief!)
-5 stitch markers
-tapestry needle
-one button, about 7/8”, and a sharp needle and thread to attach it, if needed

This is a written pattern with a schematic, and the actual instruction takes up one rather wordy page. There are plenty of photos, and a link to an in-depth tutorial/discussion of different centered decreases.