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Swirl Socks

Knitting
November 2012
Fingering / 4 ply (14 wpi) ?
30 stitches = 4 inches in stocking stitch
US 1½ - 2.5 mm
400 - 420 yards (366 - 384 m)
Women's Medium
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4/23/13 UPDATE: Based on knitter’s feedback, I’ve added a 2nd heel option. This pattern now contains 2 separate sets of instructions. One for a short row heel and one for a heel flap, using Cat Bordhi’s Riverbed Heel Architecture from her book New Pathways for Sock Knitters, Book One. Used by permission from Cat Bordhi. Both versions have been tested. Each sock knitter will have their own preference as to which heel they use. I’m just offering 2 options for you to choose from. PDF has been updated.

Inspired by a dear friend who convinced me to give toe-up socks a chance, these socks are a quick and satisfying knit. The lines flow into one another, reminding me of swirls of water or ripples on a field of snow on a winter morning.

The pattern is intended to be customizable. No two pairs of feet are the same and it’s easy to customize the width of the cuff or leg portion of the sock. That’s what I love about this pattern (the back of the sock is a simple broken 2x2 rib), if you need to make the circumference of the sock bigger or smaller, simply adjust the number of stitches by adding or removing repeats of these rib stitches.

Note that adjustments to the pattern may change yardage requirements.

The 16 row pattern repeat includes a “rest” row of knit sts on every even numbered row, making this a very quick knit. The swirl pattern is 44 sts wide, running over the edge of the foot a few sts on each side.

The anklet version of the sock is not documented in the pattern. It was just a modification I made which I thought suited the ankle socks. After turning the heel, continue knitting in pattern until the socks are at ankle length and then use a picot bind off. You can Google for different methods, but here are the two resources I used: A tutorial I followed on About.com. I also found this information on Knitty.com in an article about different bind off methods.