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The Lady Edith

Knitting
Fingering / 4 ply (14 wpi) ?
US 5 - 3.75 mm
One Size
This pattern is available for $4.00 USD buy it now

Before purchasing - note that some knitters are not happy with the delineation of the stitches between the increase and decreases. I offer a solution in the pattern, but prefer the method I used and therefore the decreases end up being more prominent than the increases.

Thank you to my test knitters:
WhimsicalRain
Jeanette93
tgknits
ThisMomKnitsToo
KateJonze !!!

The Lady Edith is my latest shawl design. It’s inspired by the Lady Edith Crawley of Downton Abbey. Edith, the sister everyone loves to hate, is a curious character in my opinion. When we first meet Lady Edith, she is curt and bitter. She seems quite cold and unpleasant. But after we learn more about Edith, we come to understand that she has forever been in her sisters’ shadows - not as pretty or sought after by the society men as Mary. She’s not politically minded and spirited like Sybil. And while Lady Grantham and the Dowager Countess are constantly worried about Mary’s position and Sybil’s prospects, Edith’s needs get swept under the carpet. We see a different Edith - an Edith who can be fearless and learn to drive a car; a sympathetic Edith, who reads to the wounded soldiers convalescing. We discover that Edith is deeper than she first appears.

When I started knitting this shawl, I immediately thought of Edith. It’s a mostly plain, stockinette stitch shawl in a traditional triangular shape, with just a touch of elegant lace gracing the bottom - but not too garish! I imagine Edith, in her dressing gown, curled up in this shawl, reading from her tiny book before bed.

This shawl is knit from side to side. It can be knit out of any weight or any amount of yarn. Using a scale will help one determine the total weight of the yarn prior to beginning the shawl. You begin knitting at one point and increase until half of the yarn is used up. Once approx. half of the yarn is used, you decrease. This is a wonderfully simple shawl with very little lace work.