The Ominous Lighthouse Hat by Amanda B Collins

The Ominous Lighthouse Hat

Knitting
January 2013
Aran (8 wpi) ?
17 stitches and 22 rows = 4 inches
US 8 - 5.0 mm
US 7 - 4.5 mm
110 - 165 yards (101 - 151 m)
small (for 20" head circumference) and large (for 22")
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This pattern is available for £2.20 GBP
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www.owlprintpanda.blogspot.co.uk

This is a striped, slouchy style hat with a ribbed brim, striped body and pompom finish.

Worked upwards completely in the round, the hat is ribbed for the brim, then uses simple knit stitches for the main body; using two colours & an (optional) jogless stripe technique.

Instructions are provided for two hat sizes. The length of the hat can also be altered by adding repeat rows within the pattern (as explained in pattern instructions).



Finished Measurements:
Small(Large) finished size to fit 20”(22”) circumference heads.

Yarn:
Two complimentary colours of aran weight yarn, 120 – 180m; or approximately 60-80m(70-90m) of each colour will be required, allowing yourself an amount at the higher end of the range if you wish to elongate the hat or add larger pompoms.

Model hat is knit using Rowan Purelife British Sheep Breeds Fine Boucle, in ‘Dark Brown Masham’ and ‘Masham Stripe’.

Needles:
5mm (US size 8) Double Pointed or Circular needles. You may wish to use smaller needles for the ribbed brim (e.g. 4.5mm or US size 7) to make it tighter.

Gauge:
Because this is a wooly slouchy hat, don’t be too worried about your gauge. The model hat is knitted to a gauge of 17 stitches by 22 rows in four inches on 5mm needles.





Cheesy hat-story (history, gettit? muahahaha):

Whilst visiting my partners relatives on Mull, we decided to walk one of the many trails on the island. The entire week was stormy, the walk was one of the wettest I have ever embarked upon - the weather threw hailstones, sheets of rain and gale force winds at us. Suddenly, looming in the distance, we spotted the Ominous Lighthouse. I decided I loved this lighthouse and upon arriving back at home in front of the warm fire, delved into the yarn stash I had packed in my suitcase (don’t we all take unnecessary yarn on holiday with us?) and chose the warmest most rustic yarn I could find. Serendipity dictated that I had indeed brought the wooliest most sheep-like yarn I own, and the lighthouse seemed destined to influence this hat.

So when you’re choosing your yarn, and knitting your yummy scrunchy warm hat, think on the wind and the hail, and of the looming lighthouse by the cold winter sea.