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Urban Troubadour

Marylene Lynx Designs
The Troubadour Collection
Renaissance Dyeing
Knitting
July 2010
Fingering / 4 ply (14 wpi) ?
23 stitches and 23 rows = 4 inches in stockinette
US 4 - 3.5 mm
950 - 1100 yards (869 - 1006 m)
Small-Medium-Large
This pattern is available for €6.00 EUR buy it now

This capelet/cowl/hood, can be worn by both sexes, it is designed in two colourways.

Urban Troubadour is inspired by Medieval Times but with a modern feel to it. Knitted in six shades of an organic 4-ply Dorset Poll and plant dyed by Renaissance Dyeing in the French Pyrenees. These shades are dyed with the plants woad and madder that would have grown wild and used for dyeing in the Middle ages.

The design is part of a knitting kit, made in collaboration with Renaissance Dyeing. Together with other knit designs from 4 different designers world-wide, this knitting kit was presented during the London Knitnation 29-31 July 2010

This pattern is available now either
as part of a knitting kit
or it can be purchased individually as PDF via ravelry.

For more information about the kit, see here:
Renaissance Dyeing - Urban Troubadour Kit

Troupe of Troubadours KAL
2010 October KAL/CAL: Urban Troubadour

The Urban Troubadour kit - size=
One size, fitting clothing size M
Length capelet= 36 cm / 14.17 in + hood = 34 cm / 13.38 in,
total= 70 cm / 27.55 in (after steam-blocking)
Width = bottom= 57cm / 22,4 in – top= 30 cm / 11.81 in (after steam-blocking)

If you would like to create a smaller or bigger version of Urban Troubadour you can use 3mm / US 2 ½ or 4mm / US 6 size needles

Dear knitters,
I have noticed that there is a problem with the abbreviation p(k2tog)o I use in my pattern. It is briefly explained in the list of abbreviations at the top of the pattern, but allow me to clarify.
p(k2tog)o = k2tog, k1, pass k2tog over k1
In order to achieve this decrease, you will knit the next two stitches together, then knit one and pass the two knit-together stitches over this last stitch.

Translated by Redsamur
Test knit and corrected by Catherine Wallace