Curlew by Amy Herzog
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Curlew

Knitting
April 2016
DK (11 wpi) ?
21 stitches and 32 rows = 4 inches
in Stockinette Stitch with yarns held together
US 6 - 4.0 mm
900 - 1900 yards (823 - 1737 m)
34 (36, 371⁄2, 40, 42, 44, 46, 48, 50, 52, 56, 60)’’ / 86.5 (91.5, 95.5, 101.5, 106.5, 112, 117, 122, 127, 132, 142, 152.5) cm
This pattern is available for $8.00 USD
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I created Curlew for my Spring 2016 make. wear. love. retreat in Pacific Grove, CA. The Monterey Peninsula is temperate and breezy year-round, so wool is always welcome - and this relaxed, effortless-looking cardigan fits in perfectly with the area’s casual ocean-front style.

The strong vertical lines of open cardigans are flattering to most figures, and the heathered look of the combination of Shibui yarns I used makes a fabric that’s easily dressed up or down. (Also, be warned: It’s decadently soft and light.)

The open front and 3/4 sleeves are easy to layer, and the narrow neck opening helps keep everything in place as you move. 2x2 ribbing trims the cardigan fronts and sleeve cuffs, and the bottom hem is unfinished, giving an ever-so-slight roll for a super-clean look.

The fit of this cardigan is meant to be relaxed, with no waist shaping and generous armholes. The lovely motion of this sweater lies in its fabric: When worked together, the two kinds of silk in Staccato/ Pebble produce a soft, slightly-nubby fabric with terrific drape; the wools give it incredible lightness. I strongly recommend using the listed materials if at all possible.

Curlew is worked in a single piece, sideways, with minimal shaping, which makes it great for a first sweater. This construction looks somewhat strange on the needles, though, so there’s a helpful guide and clear schematic included in the pattern’s PDF.